Henry Interviewed by Lizzy Stevens

Interviewed by fellow author Lizzie Stevens.

https://lizzystevens.blogspot.com/2019/04/guest-blogger-henry-anderson.html

Cape Misfortun4

Please tell us about your latest book.
“Cape Misfortune” is a fantasy adventure about a disgraced Sheriff’s deputy on the foggy Pacific Northwest coast. Her world is turned upside down investigating disappearances that may be supernatural in origin.

What can we expect from you in the future?
I’m hoping to turn “Cape Misfortune” into a series. I’m also writing some steampunk-inspired short stories I hope to collect in a book.

How do we find out about you and your books?
 The best place is my website https://henryandersonbooks.com You can read my blog, read free short stories and get the latest news on what I’m up to. I’m active on twitter http://www.twitter.com/macandersauthor, Instagram http://www.instagram.com/macanderz and I have a Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/henryandersonauthor My Amazon author page is: http://author.to/henryanderson
How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?
Huge amounts, although I try and smuggle experiences in so it’s not too obviously autobiographical. Characters are usually secretly based on real people. It’s quite good fun putting yourself, or people you know, in a fantasy situation.
When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?
I’ve always enjoyed writing. I wrote plays at university and worked as a news reporter. I had cancer (I’m now in complete remission) and my prognosis wasn’t initially very good. It convinced me to finish a novel I had been planning for years called “The Mouth.” It’s set in places I grew up in but in an alternate universe where things have gone badly wrong. I submitted it and got lucky when a great outfit called Solstice Publishing picked it up.

What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?
 I love the great outdoors when I can get out there. I enjoy oil painting and a bit of archery in the summer.
Where do your ideas come from?
I daydream quite a lot. At night ideas arrive while I’m dropping off to sleep. I keep a pad by the bed because if I don’t write it down the idea will have disappeared by the morning.

Do you feel humor is important in books and why?

I do. It’s part of the human experience and a way of connecting with characters. There is humor even in the bleakest situations.

What kind of research do you do?

Working as a news reporter on a national newspaper taught me the importance of research. In a story I generally use real places as a starting point, even though they end up fictionalised. The Internet is a real help if you can’t physically get to a location – Google Earth Street View, live cams, police radio, talking to people online. It all adds authenticity. Even building a fantasy world is helped by researching world folklore and mythology.
Tell us about yourself
I studied English at Oxford. I worked on farms in Australia before working in publishing and journalism. I live in a village in Kent.
Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?
Isaac Asimov said “Just write every day of your life…Then see what happens.” I think that is good advice. I generally try to schedule time each day.

What are some of your favorite things to do?

I like looking at art, particularly paintings. I also enjoy world cinema, old horror movies, and binge-watching tv shows.
Who are some of your other favorite authors to read? Thinking about it, they are mainly fantasy writers like Susan Cooper, Alan Garner, Jules Verne, Stephen King, Alan Moore.
Where do you see yourself in five years?
Hopefully still breathing.

After you’ve written your book and it’s been published, do you ever buy it and/or read it?

I buy it, yes. I don’t read it immediately, though. When you’re close to it you still feel the urge to revise! Later it seems more like a done deal. You can appreciate it as a book.

What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?

It gives life meaning. It’s making something, which is always satisfying. 
If you weren’t writing, what would you be doing?Reading more things written by other people. Possibly slouching in front of the tv eating potato chips.

Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?
Keep writing because it is one of those activities where you are always learning.

Henry Interviewed by Lizzy Stevens

Interviewed by Amazon and Fictionwise best-selling author Lizzy Stevens.

http://lizzystevens.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/guest-blogger-henry-anderson.html

Please tell us about your latest book.

“The Mouth” is a sci fi adventure story about a teenager whose town is burned down and family killed. His only chance of survival is to travel through a dangerous device called “The Mouth” that opens doors into other worlds.

What can we expect from you in the future?

I’m currently writing an urban fantasy about a police officer who uncovers some secrets in a strange town. I’m hoping it might turn into a series.

How do we find out about you and your books?
A good place to start would be my website at https://henryandersonbooks.com. I’m on Twitter at https://twitter.com/handersonbooks and my Facebook is: https://www.facebook.com/henry.anderson.books. My Amazon author page is: http://author.to/henryanderson

Why did you decide to write Science Fiction?
I feel like science fiction/fantasy chose me – in the sense that it interests me. I think speculative fiction can make you look at familiar things differently.

How much of your personality and life experiences are in your writing?

Quite a lot. I try and smuggle experiences in so it’s not too obvious it’s autobiographical. Life events like recently surviving cancer change you as a person and consequently as a writer.

When did you first think about writing and what prompted you to submit your first ms?

They made a “Planet of the Apes” TV show when I was a kid and I was captivated by it. I wrote a story set in that world – I was about eight. I’ve written things on-and-off since then – I had some plays performed. A recent health scare spurred me into action. My first novel submission was to Solstice Publishing a few months ago.

Do you have a set schedule for writing or do you just go with the flow?

I go with the flow. I take my trusty laptop with me wherever I go. I spend an unhealthy amount of time in coffee shops. I have a very low minimum word count. Some days it comes easier than others.

What do you do to relax and recharge your batteries?

I took up archery a couple of years ago which makes a change from writing. I read a lot. Also I listen to audiobooks a lot.

What truly motivates you in general? In your writing?
Anger and fear. And love.

Where do your ideas come from?
I wish I knew. Somewhere in a primitive part of my brain.

Do you feel humour is important in science fiction and why?

Humour is definitely an important part of storytelling. I tend to write darkly humorous situations if not out-and-out comedy.

What kind of research do you do?

I have always enjoyed going into libraries, so I still do that a bit. The Internet is a massive resource. But, being honest, I do as little research as I can get away with.

Tell us about yourself
I’m an English graduate and former journalist. I live in a village in Kent. I like painting in oils and writing.

Do you have a favorite author? Favorite book?

The author I most enjoy reading is P.G. Wodehouse. His prose brightens up any day. Evelyn Waugh said: “The gardens of Blandings Castle are that original garden from which we are all exiled.”

My favourite book is probably “Kidnapped” by Robert Louis Stevenson. I like adventure stories and it’s a masterpiece.

How many books have you written, how many have been published?
I’ve written a few short stories and plays. This is the first novel. I’m very excited Solstice is publishing it.

After you’ve written your book and it’s been published, do you ever buy it or read it?
I think Leonardo da Vinci said : “”Art is never finished, only abandoned.” Eventually you have to abandon it somewhere and drive off. Kind of like literary fly-tipping.

Which comes first, the story, the characters or the setting?

I usually think of a setting first – to test the characters.

What is the most rewarding thing about being a writer?

The thought that someone might actually read your stuff is pretty amazing.

Are there any words of encouragement for unpublished writers?

On bad days any writer feels despair that what they are doing might be worthless. Ignore those feelings and keep writing. Write. Write as if your life depended on it!

Lizzy Stevens links:

http://lizzystevens.blogspot.co.uk

http://twitter.com/LizzyStevens123 

 

While you’re here, why not check out my interview with author Penny Estelle:

http://pennyestelle.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/henry-anderson-stops-by-pennys-tales.html

A playlist of music that loosely influenced “The Mouth”

playlist-1280x-426

“The Mouth” is out now. To celebrate, here are some songs that vaguely inspired it.

UnknownThis playlist is available on Spotify

1. “Slow boat to China” performed by Freddy Martin. It didn’t survive the final draft but this was playing on the gramaphone in the collaborator’s living room.

2. “I Fought the Law” by the Bobby Fuller Four. The Clash covered this song in the 70s. The Bobby Fuller Four’s earlier version is more upbeat and has the same defiant tone.

3. “Hold On” by John Lennon. Sometimes all you can do is hold on.

4. “God Save the Queen” by the Sex Pistols. Johnny Rotten claimed: “You don’t write ‘God Save The Queen’ because you hate the English race. You write a song like that because you love them, and you’re fed up with them being mistreated.”

5. “Lord Grenville” by Al Stewart. A wistful folk-rock song told from the viewpoint of a disillusioned sailor. Grenville was a British sea captain who sailed his crew towards a hostile Spanish fleet of 53 vessels.

6. “Hurricane” by Bob Dylan. Smetimes, as in the case of Rubin “Hurricane” Carter,  it is worth keeping the faith.

7. “The Teddy Bear’s Picnic” performed by Henry Hall and his Orchestra. It’s probably just me but I’ve always found this a tiny bit sinister.

8. “War on Freedom” by Killing Joke.

9. “Everybody’s Fool” by Evanescence. There are people around who keep everybody fooled.

10. “I’m Leaving You Because I Don’t Love You” by Jens Lekman. The kind of love song people might sing to each other in a dystopian future.