Interviewed at the Drovers Gap

Interviewed at the Drovers Gap by the charming Henry Mitchell, who reads and writes in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Northern Carolina. Henry to Henry…

https://droversgap.blogspot.com/2021/02/henry-to-henry.html

Picture from Henry’s Website

DROVERS GAP
. . . A STORY PLACE, NOT TOTALLY A FICTION, NOT QUITE ON A MAP.

February 25, 2021
HENRY TO HENRY…

I read Henry Anderson’s new novel, Cape Misfortune II, in a day. I can’t remember the last time I did that. It was hard to put down, even for dinner. I skipped dessert.

We had a Henry to Henry conversation across the water (via email), about his new book, and writing in general. Here’s what we talked about:

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Words for Mud, Ray Bradbury, Catherine Crowe.

Catherine Crowe
  1. Recent goings on.

Hello. It’s February 2021.  As I type this the rain is beating on the conservatory roof. Nearly all the paths around where I live are thick mud. Other words for mud, incidentally, include slobber, slabber, slutch, and lutulence, according to the Oxford English Dictionary. 

Continue reading “Words for Mud, Ray Bradbury, Catherine Crowe.”

Edgar Allan Poe’s Less Successful First Detective.

Edgar Allan Poe

It is often claimed Edgar Allan Poe invented the modern detective story in “The Murder in the Rue Morgue.”

When the character of C. Auguste Dupin first appeared in 1841, the word detective did not yet exist.

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Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Green Tea” and The Horror of Psychological Horror

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Illustration from Sheridan Le Fanu’s “Green Tea,” by Edward Ardizzone.

There are no monsters in real-life, right? No ghosts, vampires or werewolves? So to avoid being laughed at some supernatural writers choose to go down the psychological route.

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